Monday, February 8, 2010

Work-in-Progress: Developing the eye area

In the most recent photos of this drawing taken yesterday, I have been working my way up the pale horse's face, as well as developing the eye and surrounding area.  Following my last post several days ago a good friend emailed me and asked, "Are you going to tone down those eyelashes?? "  (Emphasis is mine.) 

The question immediately propelled me into completing the layering in the eye area.  Upon doing this, I realized that Scottish artist Elizabeth McCrindle may have a good point.  She describes that the correct development and placement of the eye(s) is very important to her, and can effect the successful execution of the remainder of the painting.  Therefore she prefers to do this early in a painting's process.  There was something about rendering the eye area that resulted in my feeling more engaged in what I was doing: the pale horse suddenly had a soul, and it energized me.  Often my work has been somewhat methodical, beginning in one area and working my way across the surface: but I may follow Elizabeth's lead and make a point to draw in these 'windows to the soul' sooner than I may have chosen to before.

................Which causes me to consider -- how much I have learned over the past months by taking the time to read other artist's blogs!  Increasingly I find too, as I've stated before, that I learn to draw simply by drawing.

Thanks for reading.

12 comments:

  1. How very gorgeous and moving this image is! Your work is an inspiration!

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  2. Lynda~ this piece is progressing wonderfully. I agree, the placement and way light hits the eye, if done properly, can bring so much life to a drawing or painting. Looking forward to seeing the end result of this work.

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  3. Looking gorgeous Linda and your are so right I have learnt so much from other Blogs including yours and like you for me every painting/drawing is a learning curve and an encouragement on my journey.
    For me right now looking at your work, I see a tired soul even a hint of sadness but also relief to that they're friend is there to lean on...it's truly beautiful :)

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  4. WOW!!!!! Simply moving! Great job Lynda!

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  5. This is so beautiful. I am loving every stage you're posting, and looking forward to seeing more. What a wonderful connection between the two horses.

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  6. Thankyou everyone for your very kind words. Some of you may have read the post, prior to my starting this piece, which described the circumstances of these two horses. They are wild horses in Wyoming that had been captured by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management during a round-up, and placed in a holding pen. The photo references from our shoot there are very moving -- I just hope to do them justice.

    Christine........welcome!

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  7. this is looking so beautiful :) I would have loved to have seen these mustangs, sad they are not in the wild :( I would prefer for the horses to run wild, but like most wild animals humans keep causing them problems.

    I usually do the eyes on a piece first, if the eyes are not right it could ruin the whole feeling of a piece of work.

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  8. I would have to agree with several of the other comments. On closeups of wildlife I do the eye first as that creates the whole soul of the animal.
    This is going to be a fantastic painting, Lynda. you are creating something really special. I hope you have plans to enter it into some shows.

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  9. Wow. In addition to being drawn beautiful, these horses have so much personality! I am looking forward to seeing the final piece.

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  10. Jennifer, on a couple of occasions I have had the opportunity to follow wild horse herds in their habitat and photograph them: it is an awe-inspiring experience.

    Yes, Gary; I have some plans for this one........More on that later though.

    Thanks Holly, and nice to 'see' you. Hoping things are going wonderfully in your new house and studio.

    Thankyou all. : )

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  11. What draws me into this piece is the emotion expressed by the horses. So often equine art shows a horse standing there like a statue! This shows the feelings of these magnificent animals.

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  12. Thank you so much Barb: great to see you in Jackson last month!

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